Bermuda’s Other Islands

Castle Island

Castle Island is part of the chain which makes up Bermuda. It is located in St. George’s Parish, in the northeast of the territory.
The 3.5 acre (1.4 hectare) island is situated close to the entrance to Castle Harbour, to the north of the Tucker’s Town Peninsula.

Originally called King’s Island, it is of historical significance. The King’s Castle stone fortification on the island – which gives the harbour its name – dates to 1612, and is the oldest standing English fortification in the New World and oldest stone building still in existence in Bermuda. The castle was the site of the successful defence of Bermuda from Spanish attack in 1614.

Several other fortifications from the same period are located on this, and nearby islands. This string of small islands, across the south of Castle Harbour, are known collectively as the Castle Islands. These forts, together with St. George’s Town, and other forts in the parish, are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site “Historic Town of St George and Related Fortifications”.


 

Coney Island

Coney Island is located in St. George’s Parish, in the northeast of the territory. The island cover 14.5 acres (5.9 hectares), close to the western entrance to Castle Harbor, southwest of the town of St. George’s and close to the southern entrance to Ferry Reach.


 

Cooper’s Island

Coopers Island Nature Reserve MapCooper’s Island is located in St. George’s Parish, in the northeast of the territory.
The 77 acre (31 hectare) island is located in the northeast of Castle Harbor, and thanks to reclamation work is now joined to St. David’s Island as a southeastern peninsula, although for most purposes it is still considered as though it were a separate island. Its most notable feature is the expanse of Annie’s Bay, which stretches along much of the island’s east coast.

The island has been used by many United States Government agencies, having been the property of the US Army, US Air Force and US Navy (which relinquished the island in 1995), as well as previously being occupied by a NASA space tracking station. Until 1995, access was restricted, it is now open to the public.


 

Darrell’s Island

Darrell’s Island is a small island within the Great Sound of Bermuda. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is in the north of Warwick Parish. it is owned by the Bermuda Government.
The islands of the Great Sound were part of the Royal Naval land purchases in Bermuda following the American War of Independence. The Royal Navy used the islands for various purposes in the Nineteenth Century.

Darrell’s Island was also used as a quarantine station. During the Second Boer War, it was used (along with several of its neighbours) as a prisoner of war camp. In 1936, Imperial Airways built an air station on Darrell’s. This operated as a staging point on scheduled trans-Atlantic flights by Imperial Airways and Pan American. The Island was taken over as a Royal Air Force station during The Second World War.

After the war, it returned to civil operation until air services moved to new land-based facilities at Kindley Field (now Bermuda International Airport). Subsequently, Darrell’s Island was briefly used for film location work.


 

Hawkins Island

Hawkins Island is a small island within Great sound. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is in the north of Warwick Parish.
Originally named Elizabeth’s or Tatem Island, it was re-named in 1809.
Now privately owned,by the Cox family, it was formerly the property of the Royal Navy, and was a Boer War prisoner of war camp from 1901 to 1902 the watch tower of the camp stil stands but has bean converted into a home. It is the most easterly of the group of islands stretching across the sound from the Salt Kettle peninsula.


 

Hinson’s Island

hinsons_islandHinson’s Island is a small island within the Great Sound of Bermuda. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is part of Paget parish, although it was formerly part of Warwick Parish and is still within the Warwick North constituency.
Hinson’s Island is the only island in Bermuda served by the government ferry system. The population of Hinson’s Island is approximately 50 people.

Hinson’s (formerly known as Brown’s or Godet’s) Island is one of the larger islands in the Great Sound. Like its neighbours, it was used as a prisoner of war camp during the Second Boer War, then became the base for Bermuda’s first seaplane service.


 

Long Island

Long Island is a small island within the Great Sound, Bermuda of Bermuda. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is in the north of Warwick Parish. Like its neighbour Hawkins Island, it was a prisoner of war camp during the Second Boer War from 1901 to 1902.


 

Marshall’s Island

Marshall’s Island is a small island within the Great Sound of Bermuda. It lies in the southeast of the sound, and is in the north of Warwick Parish. The island is in two distinct parts, joined by a narrow neck.
Previously owned by the Royal Navy, it is now privately owned.


 

Ordnance Island

Ordnance Island is located within the limits of St. George’s town, Bermuda. It lies close to the shore opposite the town square (King’s Square), in St. George’s Harbour.
The only island in the town, it covers just 1.75 acres and was created by reclaiming the land between several small islands which were once situated here. The original islands of Ducking Stool, Frazer’s and Gallows were used, in the early days of the colony, for executions. Joined together to form Ordnance Island, they became a Royal Army Ordnance Corps (RAOC) depot in the 19th Century, supplying ordnance to forts and batteries around St. George’s. By the Second World War, it had fallen into disuse with the Army and was loaned to the US Navy for use as a submarine base.

The island is now joined to St. George’s Island by a small bridge. Most of the buildings erected by the Army and the US Navy have been razed. One large Army building, the Storekeeper’s House remains, and was recently refurbished as offices for the Corporation of St. George. The only other buildings on the island are an office of HM Customs used to clear visiting yachts, and a new cruise ship terminal. There is, however, a prominent replica of the Deliverance located on the island.

The original was one of the two ships built by the survivors of the Sea Venture, flagship of the Virginia Company, which was wrecked in Bermuda in 1609, accidentally beginning Bermuda’s settlement. There is also a statue of Sir George Somer’s, Admiral of the Virginia Company, who was at the helm of the Sea Venture when she was driven on the reefs, and is credited as the founder of Bermuda, which is also known as The Somers Isles.


 

Paget Island

Paget Island is part of the chain which makes up Bermuda. It is located in St. George’s Parish, in the northeast of the territory.
The 36 acre (14.5 hectare) island is located at the northern entrance to St. George’s Harbor, east of the town of St. George’s and just to the north of the slightly larger Smith’s Island. Its most prominent feature is Fort Cunningham, built in the 1820s and of historical importance, though now in a state of disrepair.


 

Smith’s Island

Smith’s Island is part of the chain which makes up Bermuda. It is located in St. George’s Parish, in the northeast of the territory.
The 61 acre (24.5 hectare) island is located close to the northern entrance to St. George’s Harbour, east of the town of St. George’s to the south of the slightly smaller Paget Island and close to the coast of the much larger St. David’s Island.
The island is of historical significance, as it is the site of the first settlement in Bermuda, when Carter, Chard and Waters built cabins here in 1610, who remained behind after the other survivors of the 1609 wreck of the Sea Venture sailed for Jamestown, Virginia. This was two years before the first planned colonists arrived on July 11, 1612.


 

Trunk Island

Trunk Island is the largest island in Harrington Sound, Bermuda. It is seven acres. Comprised of two houses, the main mansion and a guest cottage. The island has been owned by the Tucker/Gardner family since the early 1800s and was used as a summer camp for Bermudian groups such as Sea Scouts and Girl Guides in the 1920s and 1930s.

It remains privately owned by descendants of the first owners. Now a share of the ownership has been donated to the Bermuda Zoological Society which supports educational programs at the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo.

Share